Archives for category: Security

Ecommerce in Nigeria
Nigeria is the largest country by population in Sub-Saharan Africa and it also has the biggest economy. By 2030, one in every six Africans will be Nigerians, and Nigeria will have one of the 25 largest economies in the world. One area to look for continued growth and real opportunity is E-Commerce or M-Commerce (Mobile Commerce). In 2014 Nigeria recorded over $2 million worth of online transactions per week and close to $1.3 billion monthly. Nigeria’s e-commerce market is developing rapidly, with an estimated growth rate of 25 percent annually.

According to an online researcher, emarketer, while e-commerce across the rest of the world is growing at 16.8 per cent, Africa’s e-commerce space is growing at a rate of 25.8 per cent – making it the fastest growing in the world. Nigerians are notorious for their love of shopping. The Euromonitor Nigeria in a 2011 report revealed that Nigerians spend $6.3 billion per year on clothing. In a recent survey conducted by Philip Consulting 38 percent of Nigerians prefer to buy products through the internet. Middle class consumers are the biggest purchasers online. Nigeria’s middle class now accounts for 28 percent of the population, and the middle class are well educated, with 92 percent having completed a post-secondary school education. This middle class is brand conscious and tech savvy and their technology of choice is a mobile device.

Mobile phone shopping
A Terragon Group study in 2014 shows 63 per cent of Nigerian internet users had bought at least one item online. 60 percent of these buyers claimed to have used their mobile phones for these purchases. 86 percent of the respondents to the Terragon Group study claim to carry out research about an item before making a purchase, and 80 per cent pointed at mobile as their major platform for research. Mobile is the first and major point of access for all internet activities. Nigeria is the largest mobile market in Africa and the 10th largest in the world. 71 million Nigerians access Internet via mobile phones according to statistics released by the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC) and Nigeria was number eight among the top 10 internet user countries in the world.

connectivityOne of the keys to growth in e-commerce is connectivity. Internet access in the past has been spotty at best, but is getting better. Nigeria’s internet subscriber base rose from 48.2 million in June 2013 to 67.4 million in June 2014. This represents a density of 40 percent, placing the country above the African average of around 16 percent, as estimated by McKinsey & Company. Nigeria’s internet access market is set to witness a huge boost, as the federal government has set the target of a five-fold increase in broadband penetration by 2018. This is continued good news for e-commerce in Nigeria and Nigeria’s Minister of Communications Technology, Dr. Omobola Johnson, has said that Nigeria’s e-commerce market has a potential worth of $10 billion with about 300,000 online orders currently being made on daily basis.

Even with all the potential and the good that is currently happening there are still core issues. The lack of basic infrastructure, the failed postage system, power supply, expensive broadband internet and poor road networks are greatly inhibiting the rapid growth of e-commerce business in Nigeria. Nigeria’s notoriety for online fraud has further hindered growth. In 2005, PayPal closed all Nigerian accounts and denied registration to any user traced to a Nigerian IP address. PayPal has since changed that policy and entered the Nigerian market this past summer. Outdated myths can be hard to shake and unfortunately some still see Nigeria as a haven to scam artists and fraud. Another area of concern is cybercrime. The lack of legislation that specifically targets cybercrime or cyber security has no doubt continually hampered accelerated growth in the e-commerce sector. Legal intervention will need to be raised to deal with future nefarious activities online.

Nigerians shopping
There are tremendous opportunities for e-commerce growth. In Nigeria shopping is a task that takes an incredible amount of time and effort. Many wealthy Nigerians still travel abroad to shop. Some of the reasons for going abroad are limitations on what one can buy online and the challenges associated with online shopping systems. Increased internet access, more affordable data costs, mobile connectivity, the convenience offered by online shopping, and a better product offering should attract more Nigerian consumers to make use of e-commerce sites. Two of Nigeria’s largest e-commerce sites, Jumia and Konga, have seen continued growth and as more players enter the market not only will the consumer benefit, but the Nigerian economy should benefit as well.

Anthony Bio for Blogs

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When we think of the potential for a cashless society we tend to look at the developed World and markets such as the United States or Europe as the places most likely for this development.  Even with credit cards and smart phones being ubiquitous throughout these countries you would be wise to look to emerging markets as the potential birthplace of a future cashless society.

cash is king

Mobile technology is growing and more than 1.7 billion people have cell phones but no bank accounts in emerging and developing markets.  According to the GMSA in 2012 there were123 mobile-money deployments in emerging markets, with 84 of them originating within the last 3 years.  Mobile money has the ability to offer financial services to the unbanked and reach consumers in the remotest parts of the World.  Even with the potential there is still a long way to go and Nigeria is a great example of this.Image

One of the emerging countries leading the cashless society initiative is Nigeria.  The cashless initiative in Nigeria is in its early stages.  The Central Bank of Nigeria, or CBN, has estimated that it will cost over $930 million to invest in new POS terminals, ATM’s, and payment solutions by 2015 as part of its “Cash-Less Lagos Project”.  Recently the CBN announced 40 billion Naira per day is being transacted virtually and the bulk of these transactions are being conducted in Lagos.

Initially CBN was targeting a phased approach post-pilot in Lagos State and then moving to a second phase which CBN claimed would cover close to 90% of all financial transactions in the country.  Due to the success of the Lagos Pilot CBN decided to implement the cashless push nationwide.  One of the stumbling blocks was the lack of infrastructure to facilitate cashless transactions conveniently and relatively close to the population. Kim Fraser, COO of MMIT, commented on the problems with the pilot program in Nigeria.  “In the Lagos Pilot there were only 10,000 POS systems on the ground in Lagos State.   Today there are over 150,000 POS systems deployed. It is still a small number to cover a country as large as Nigeria.  In addition the CBN has also realized that the term “Cashless” was scaring a lot of people especially in a country where 80% of the population is unbanked. The new catch phrase that the CBN prefers is “Cashlite”. There is still a significant way to go even under the new mantra of Cashlite though CBN appears to be making progress”.

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The debate for a cashless society has its positives and negatives.  For financial institutions a positive development of a cashless society is its ability to reduce costs required to print money and increase its consumer base and services to include the non-banked of the emerging and developing World.  For consumers there is an ease for transactions and the prospect of no longer having to carry cash.  Carrying cash can be a major problem in emerging countries where the risk of being robbed is greater. There is also potential for less corruption and more transparency in a cashless society.

The negatives include the invasion of privacy; security and fraud, and the wide divergence in the experience of mobile money service providers around the world.  There are some obvious hurdles that are slowing the progress of a cashless society including the lack of infrastructure, scalability, and the sustainability of mobile financial services.  So what does this mean for telecom and financial institutions?  It means there exists opportunities for the continued development of new financial products and greater customer education for their products.  If the telecom providers and financial institutions can create a healthy relationship with each other and with their consumer bases there can be continued growth and success for mobile money and other cashless initiatives.

Anthony Bio for Blogs

 

 

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MMIT’s M-Content platform has been developed with the African Sub-Saharan market in mind. In a continent that is growing rapidly and has over 700 million mobile phone subscribers opportunities are endless.  In Nigeria there are over 16 million users of Facebook, Skype, Blackberry, Apple, and Android. In Kenya there are over 7 million users of these same devices.  On the flip side of those numbers only 24% of working age adults in Sub-Saharan Africa hold a traditional bank account with a formal financial institution and a considerably lower percentage of adults have credit or debit cards. With our M-Content platform we will be providing a way for this underserved segment to access and purchase online content and apps they wish to have on their mobiles and PCs.

Before I go further let me first describe our M-Content platform and some of the services it provides our consumers.  Our M-Content product allows consumers with a mobile money wallet, and also consumers who don’t have a mobile money wallet, to purchase content from sites like the Blackberry store, Google, Amazon, the Android store, and I Tunes to name a few and top up or apply credit on gaming and social media sites such as Facebook, EA Sports, Sony Play-Station, and Skype. It also allows consumers who want to purchase apps or apply credit on various sites to do so via their mobile phone, PC or tablet.  Our platform provides a convenient way to do this without the need to use credit or debit cards and instead utilize cash vouchers and the mobile wallet. This eliminates the risk of exposing one’s credit card or debit card on the internet or having the transaction denied due the card coming from a high risk region for fraud and opens the door to such E and M-commerce sites for larger numbers of consumers in emerging markets who do not have access to credit and debit cards.

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MMIT is aware of the possibilities and is currently at work on our M-Content platform and expects this product to be launched and live by the beginning of 2013.  We will keep you up to date on the product launch and will announce the official launch date once that decision has been made.  To learn more about MMIT, our M-Content platform, and the other products and services MMIT provides please visit our website at http://www.mmitonline.com.

In the Western World the idea of mobile banking/payments starts with our smartphones.  Our chief concern usually centers around privacy and security.  In the emerging World, especially Africa, mobile banking/payments are quite different and the concerns are quite different as well.  I recently talked to MMIT COO – Kim Fraser about the unique concerns and problems that face mobile wallet users in Africa:

AB: First of all thank you for taking the time today to meet with me Mr. Fraser.  I was hoping you could elaborate on the issues faced by mobile wallet users in Africa?

Kim: Thank you, and yes I can definitely speak on that.  In the west traditional banking services are universally accessible to a majority of the population through the use of ATMs, credit cards and debit cards. In Africa and other emerging markets banking services are not so universally widespread and accessible to the majority of the population. This is due to a number of factors such as the high cost of brick and mortar establishments, account opening criteria with the need for credible references, and relatively high initial deposit requirements, minimal balances, high transactional fees, cash based salary payment for many low end wage earners, etc.

In the west most mobile wallets or mobile phone banking products are based on the use of credit cards, and debit cards. They store the users card details on the phone. In developed markets most users of mobile phone technology are aware of the constant problem of identity theft in the mobile phone industry and the underground business that surrounds this activity such as illegal phone shops. Thus many view this as a security issue and an avenue for the theft of their financial details and the impending havoc it can create in ones life.

In Africa and the emerging markets with high rates of poverty the percentage of the population that is banked and using credit cards and debit cards is very small. Mobile banking in its original state, as introduced in Kenya by Safaricom (M-pesa), was not intended to target the banked but the unbanked, those that have no bank account, and no credit facilities. In this market segment the issues around adoption are different. Security is a concern but it does not revolve around identity theft but instead around the risk of carrying physical cash as opposed to carrying virtual cash, which is seen as safer. Also transaction fees for mobile banking are lower than brick and mortar banking fees, there are no minimal account balance barriers, and signing up for a mobile wallet/ bank account normally doesn’t require two reputable references that are already clients.  All it requires is a photo ID, and your phone number, and can be done at any of the mobile banking agent outlets.  Today there are 30,000 M-pesa agent outlets in Kenya and everywhere there is mobile phone service.

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AB: So really the perspective is totally different in Africa than in the West?

Kim: Yes, in Africa and other emerging markets most of the population perceive such services from a totally different perspective than in the west.  It is a game changer and an enabler not a convenience factor such as is the case in the west, where a larger percentage of the population carry smart phones and have credit, debit and ATM cards.

AB: Thank you Kim for your time and knowledge and remember you can follow Kim and MMIT at http://www.mmitonline.com.

MMIT COO – Kim Fraser