Archives for category: Mobile Technology

Ecommerce in Nigeria
Nigeria is the largest country by population in Sub-Saharan Africa and it also has the biggest economy. By 2030, one in every six Africans will be Nigerians, and Nigeria will have one of the 25 largest economies in the world. One area to look for continued growth and real opportunity is E-Commerce or M-Commerce (Mobile Commerce). In 2014 Nigeria recorded over $2 million worth of online transactions per week and close to $1.3 billion monthly. Nigeria’s e-commerce market is developing rapidly, with an estimated growth rate of 25 percent annually.

According to an online researcher, emarketer, while e-commerce across the rest of the world is growing at 16.8 per cent, Africa’s e-commerce space is growing at a rate of 25.8 per cent – making it the fastest growing in the world. Nigerians are notorious for their love of shopping. The Euromonitor Nigeria in a 2011 report revealed that Nigerians spend $6.3 billion per year on clothing. In a recent survey conducted by Philip Consulting 38 percent of Nigerians prefer to buy products through the internet. Middle class consumers are the biggest purchasers online. Nigeria’s middle class now accounts for 28 percent of the population, and the middle class are well educated, with 92 percent having completed a post-secondary school education. This middle class is brand conscious and tech savvy and their technology of choice is a mobile device.

Mobile phone shopping
A Terragon Group study in 2014 shows 63 per cent of Nigerian internet users had bought at least one item online. 60 percent of these buyers claimed to have used their mobile phones for these purchases. 86 percent of the respondents to the Terragon Group study claim to carry out research about an item before making a purchase, and 80 per cent pointed at mobile as their major platform for research. Mobile is the first and major point of access for all internet activities. Nigeria is the largest mobile market in Africa and the 10th largest in the world. 71 million Nigerians access Internet via mobile phones according to statistics released by the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC) and Nigeria was number eight among the top 10 internet user countries in the world.

connectivityOne of the keys to growth in e-commerce is connectivity. Internet access in the past has been spotty at best, but is getting better. Nigeria’s internet subscriber base rose from 48.2 million in June 2013 to 67.4 million in June 2014. This represents a density of 40 percent, placing the country above the African average of around 16 percent, as estimated by McKinsey & Company. Nigeria’s internet access market is set to witness a huge boost, as the federal government has set the target of a five-fold increase in broadband penetration by 2018. This is continued good news for e-commerce in Nigeria and Nigeria’s Minister of Communications Technology, Dr. Omobola Johnson, has said that Nigeria’s e-commerce market has a potential worth of $10 billion with about 300,000 online orders currently being made on daily basis.

Even with all the potential and the good that is currently happening there are still core issues. The lack of basic infrastructure, the failed postage system, power supply, expensive broadband internet and poor road networks are greatly inhibiting the rapid growth of e-commerce business in Nigeria. Nigeria’s notoriety for online fraud has further hindered growth. In 2005, PayPal closed all Nigerian accounts and denied registration to any user traced to a Nigerian IP address. PayPal has since changed that policy and entered the Nigerian market this past summer. Outdated myths can be hard to shake and unfortunately some still see Nigeria as a haven to scam artists and fraud. Another area of concern is cybercrime. The lack of legislation that specifically targets cybercrime or cyber security has no doubt continually hampered accelerated growth in the e-commerce sector. Legal intervention will need to be raised to deal with future nefarious activities online.

Nigerians shopping
There are tremendous opportunities for e-commerce growth. In Nigeria shopping is a task that takes an incredible amount of time and effort. Many wealthy Nigerians still travel abroad to shop. Some of the reasons for going abroad are limitations on what one can buy online and the challenges associated with online shopping systems. Increased internet access, more affordable data costs, mobile connectivity, the convenience offered by online shopping, and a better product offering should attract more Nigerian consumers to make use of e-commerce sites. Two of Nigeria’s largest e-commerce sites, Jumia and Konga, have seen continued growth and as more players enter the market not only will the consumer benefit, but the Nigerian economy should benefit as well.

Anthony Bio for Blogs

Advertisements

Uganda- the Pearl of Africa

The next country we are visiting in our “Mobile Market Look” series is the East African country of Uganda. Uganda is a small landlocked country surrounded by the Sudan to the North, the Democratic Republic of Congo to the East, Kenya to the West, and Rwanda and Tanzania to the South. An English speaking country, with many local dialects also spoken, and a population of 37.5 million, Uganda has experienced a period of political stability and economic growth. Under the leadership of President Yoweri Museveni, who came into power in 1986, Uganda has seen steady economic growth and currently has a GDP of $21 Billion USD. GDP grew by 5.8% in 2014 with expected growth of 6.6% for 2014 and the economic prospects for this country are looking up.

Business and Economic Environment

Uganda is well endowed with natural resources and agriculture and fishing are two of the biggest industries in Uganda. Up to 80% of Ugandans are farmers and agribusiness is big. Uganda is among the leading producers of coffee and bananas. It is also a major producer of tea, cotton, tobacco, cereals, oilseeds, fresh and preserved fruit, vegetables and nuts, essential oils, orchids, flowers and silk.Kampala__Uganda

Uganda also has its own issues. With a weak infrastructure, lack of education, lack of training, high unemployment (as high as 62% amongst the youth), Uganda ranks 132nd on the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business List out of 189 countries. The government is also facing an increasing threat from civil unrest. Protests commonly occur in Kampala and have turned violent although foreign interests are not generally targeted. There are moderate risks in areas of terrorism, health, crime, poor transportation infrastructure and Uganda is prone to flooding. Even with these challenges things are looking bright, especially in the area of mobile technology.

Uganda’s Mobile Landscape

Uganda has a young population, the second youngest in the World according to the World Bank. 70% of the population is under the age of 25 and mobile technology is their technology of choice. Uganda has 16 million mobile subscribers and most Ugandans own multiple phones to save money when calling different networks. Mobile providers do not offer contracts to consumers, so consumers purchase calling cards for a set amount of minutes or airtime. Uganda has a huge agency network of kiosks throughout the country where consumers can top up. Street hawkers also sell calling cards on the road, or side of the road, and Ugandans can purchase calling cards from even the remotest part of the country.MTN-mobile-money-customers

The mobile penetration rate in Uganda in 51%. Internet use is also growing as over 6 million people use the internet in Uganda, and of those 6 million people, 95% access the internet via their mobile device. Smartphones are not yet as prevalent in Uganda but Ugandans are still able to access social media via 2G and 3G technology. Ugandans use their phones to check social media, listen to the radio, and check news. Some of the most visited sites in Uganda are Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, Google, and Yahoo.

Mobile money and mobile banking are areas that have a lot of potential and have experienced major growth. Only 20% of the population is banked and 27 million Ugandans are unbanked due to poverty, bank fees, amount of documentation required to open an account, and travel costs. Mobile money has stepped in to meet the needs of this underserved part of the population. 68% of all mobile subscribers in Uganda are aware of and have used mobile money and mobile money applications. Mobile money transfers have grown from 87.5 million transactions in 2011 to 242 million at the end of 2012. The number of mobile money users has grown from 2.9 million in 2009 to over 17 million in 2014. There was an increase of 46% mobile money users from 2013 to 2014 and from June of 2013 to June of 2014 there were 445 million mobile money transactions valued at 22.2 Trillion Ugandan Shillings ($8.4B USD).

Ugandans prefer mobile money because it is a fast service and its’ accessible. Ugandans use mobile money not only to transfer money, but to pay water bills, school fees, and other utility payments such as Pay TV. Utility providers such as Umeme and National Water and Sewerage Corporation (NWSC) have partnered with mobile money service providers to ease payment systems and concentrate on their core businesses of power and water distribution.

185uganda

The list of current money transfer and mobile money providers include Airtel (Airtel Money), Africell, Uganda Telecomm (M-Sente), MCash, Yo!Payments , and WorldRemit. The biggest player in the market is MTN Uganda. MTN’s Mobile Money records 25,000 transactions per month and has a subscriber base of 8.8 million consumers.

Mobile money operators are doing well and to increase the levels of awareness for their services they have started to integrate with the banks. MTN joined a partnership with Crane Bank last year to offer MTN Mobile Money as a cash out ATM service. Other banks such as Centenary Bank and UBA (United Bank of Africa) have also gone into partnerships with MTN and other mobile money providers such as Airtel also have their own bank partnerships with financial institutions such as Equity Bank. Mobile money is continuing to grow and as technology and security becomes better will offer more value for their consumers. There is still room for value added services from the mobile money providers and financial institutions for the consumers, but overall the mobile technology space, especially mobile money and money transfers, is expanding and the future of this sector in Uganda is looking promising.

Please visit our “Mobile Market Look” series for Kenya, Nigeria, and Ghana

To follow MMIT and subscribe to our newsletter please contact us at newsletter@mmitonline.com

Anthony Bio for Blogs

nigeria-location-mapWhat lies beneath the surface of a troubled country?
People may question why would a company consider doing business in a country like Nigeria with poor infrastructure, frequent terrorist attacks, political instability, corruption, fraudulent internet activities, and more than 40% of the population living below the poverty level. What benefits could the country possibly have that outweighs such turmoil?

Most people only see the negative aspects of entering an African nation. However, to see the opportunities you have to look beyond the common perceptions and recognize the true market potential.

The most valuable resource
Africa is known for its abundance of resources such as oil, gas, gold, and diamonds, but what may be the greatest asset is often overlooked– the people. Africa is home to 1.11 billion people making it the second largest and second most populous in the world.

Traffic Lagos

Lagos, Nigeria

Nigeria is the largest country in Africa and ranked 7th worldwide in terms of population with 173.6 million people as of 2013. Not only is the population large but it is also young, entrepreneurial spirited, and growing. Roughly half the population is reported to be 19 years of age or younger. Interestingly, Nigeria reportedly has the highest total entrepreneurial activity in the world; many Nigerians tend to be innovative and business oriented by nature.

Growth and investment in a rising nation
Nigeria’s projected growth rates rival the top emerging economies – even the renowned BRICS nations.

In April 2014 Nigeria surpassed South Africa as the largest economy in Africa, with a GDP of $510 billion in 2013, $190 billion more than the GDP of South Africa. GDP grew by 7.4% in 2013 up from 6.5% in 2012 and is forecasted to achieve an average growth rate of 7.1% through 2030. Nigeria is ranked as the 26th largest economy in the world and is on track to break the top 20 by 2030. Nigeria plans to invest heavily in 5 major economic sectors to sustain growth: agriculture, trade, infrastructure, manufacturing, and liquid production of oil and gas.

The impressive growth has recently attracted investors all over the world. According to Frontier Market Sentiment Index report in the Wall Street journal, Nigeria is the number one frontier market in terms of attracting investment interests from European and American multinationals. Citing an average of 3 out of 10 major companies having Nigeria on their watch list. Large multinationals such as Dominos, YUM! Brands, and P&G are examples of businesses planning to further expand their current presence in Nigeria because of their success.

With an unsaturated market and promising future, Nigeria is considered an “economic sweet spot” for business.

A mobile hot spot  
The combination of the market size, age, and growth offers great potential to become the most lucrative mobile telecom markets in Africa. The industry accounted for more than a quarter of the GDP in 2013.

mobile Nigeria

Nigeria is ranked 8th in internet usage worldwide with over 67 million users, the majority accessing the web through their mobile phones as many do not have desktop computers and broadband issues remaining prevalent. Nigerians with their adaptive instincts have leap-frogged several technological product cycles; one instance is many people are buying cell phones before having a landline for their household. Nigeria has over 120 million mobile phone users with over 70% market penetration and is predicted to continue to grow substantially. Although mobile phone penetration is rapidly increasing, only about 25% of the population owned a smartphone in 2013 but this number is expected to increase as technologies become more affordable and as the middle class rises.

The mobile service carrier industry is fiercely competitive with main operators MTN, Airtel, Globacom, and Etisalat battling for market share. However, opportunities in other areas within the mobile sector such as applications, content, and payment methods are immense and profitable. Nigerians use their mobile phones for work, entertainment, and social media beyond typical talk and text features. Nigerians are the leading country in Africa in terms of social media use with well over 11 million users with over 6 million members on Facebook’s site alone. Nigeria ranks the 4th in terms of Facebook membership growth rate.

Nigeria is in a great position to benefit from worldly economic trends including the rising demand from emerging economies, growing demand for global resources, and spreading the digital economy. Despite the continued problems within the nation Nigeria continues to display impressive economic growth rates, a growing middle class, and a youthful population that embraces technological developments making the market extremely attractive for business.

Please visit our “Mobile Market Look” series and our look at the Kenyan mobile market

To Follow MMIT and subscribe to our newsletter please contact us at newsletter@mmitonline.com


Rebecca's blog signature

This will be the first in our new series, “Mobile Market Look”, where we look at mobile markets in Africa and other emerging countries around the World. Kenya is one of the hotbeds in terms of mobile innovation and sophistication and we hope you enjoy this article and please feel free to leave any comments you may have.

Kenya flagKenya

Africa has been growing at an unprecedented rate and Kenya is one of the fastest growing tech and mobile markets in the World. Known as “Savannah Silicon Valley”, Kenya is home to over 500 startups in the mobile and digital industries. Kenyans are extremely tech savvy and 70% of the population owns a mobile phone, with 16 million Kenyans accessing the internet through their phones. Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is home to the ihubs, incubator space for the tech community that includes 10,000 members an over 150 incubator start-up companies. Companies such as Google, Intel, and Samsung have a presence in Nairobi and IBM set up its first African Innovation Lab in Kenya. If you are in the mobile or tech industry, whether as a company or an investor, Kenya is a country you should get to know and want to do business in.

Kenya is the most developed economy in East Africa with a good education system and a strong business environment. Kenya is a young country with 70% of the population of 44 million people under the age of 35. Kenya also has its issues as 50% of the population lives in poverty and unemployment, although officially listed as 10.5%, can be as high as 40%. There are obstacles, but there are also opportunities. And no opportunity is bigger in Kenya at this time than the mobile money and mobile payment market.

Kenya’s Mobile Market Landscape

Kenya phones Kenya has the most sophisticated mobile money ecosystem in Africa, and maybe the World. Infrastructure improvements, and lack of rigid regulations by the Central Bank of Kenya and the government, have led to market growth and an increase in digital services. M-Pesa, established by Safaricom in 2007, started the current mobile payment revolution and now transacts over $5 billion annually which accounts for 17% of Kenya’s GDP. Over 2 million mobile money transactions take place every day and according to MEF studies mobile money and mobile payments still present the greatest opportunity for growth in Kenya. It is estimated that 85% of the population has used mobile money at some point and most Kenyans prefer mobile money to cash because of the ease of use and the safety. Most African nations are cash-based and people still carry large sums of cash on them, especially when they are sending money to relatives in remote parts of the country, so mobile money offers a safer and easier alternative. Kenya’s financial institutions have picked up on this and are jumping on the bandwagon and creating their own mobile money products. Equity Bank has its own M-Kesho mobile money product and I&M Bank has its own prepaid Safari Card available on the M-Pesa platform.

Even with growth and prosperity Kenya faces security issues and economic problems. There have recently been terrorist attacks on the Kenyan coast by Al-Shabaab, a Somali terrorist group associated with Al-Qaeda, and no one should forget the terrorist attacks that took place at the Westgate Mall in Nairobi over a year ago. The country has a high poverty rate and weak infrastructure and on the business side there is a lack of capital and belief and faith by investors towards the Kenyan market, and also the Sub-Saharan African market as a whole. Even the mobile market is experiencing its own issues. There is a current price war which has benefited the consumers by leading to decreased prices and more mobile subscriptions, but has created lean profit margins and less profitability for the mobile operators. There is also the concern of the dominance of Safaricom and M-Pesa who currently has the dominant mobile marketshare of 70%. Other mobile operators such as Airtel, Yu, and Orange have a presence but pale in comparison to Safaricom.ihub Kenya

Obstacles do exist, but even with these problems and many others the mobile industry in Kenya is experiencing good times. Mobile phone penetration is 78% in Kenya and Africa had an annual mobile growth rate of 82% between 2000 and 2013, highest in the World. There are currently 500 million mobile subscriptions in Africa and there is expected growth in subscriptions of 50% over the next 5 years. Kenyans have also taken to smart phone technology and 67% of all phones sold in Kenya are smartphones. Kenyans like to listen to music, play games, look for sports updates, and watch TV and video on their phones. They also like social media and Kenya has the second most Twitter users in Africa behind South Africa and the second most Facebook users in Africa behind Nigeria. So the promise and potential is bright and the opportunities for business and investment is maybe the best it has ever been. Kenya is definitely a place you should want to be!

Please visit MMIT at www.mmitonline.com and subscribe to our newsletter by contacting us at newsletter@mmitonline.com

Anthony Bio for Blogs

 

378670_456457581061135_1362891592_n

New mobile payment product M-Iflo launched to minimize risks as it is of great concern in the African markets.

Post1

MMIT in partnership with Bango, a leader in mobile payments, has officially launched a product called M-Iflo to revolutionize the security of mobile payment environment in Sub-Sahara Africa. The M-Iflo product provides a safe payment solution that enables online transactions for digital content, which will unlock many opportunities in the world of mobile payments for Africa.

Africa is rapidly becoming a mobile hot spot with many consumers’ displaying their natural ability to quickly adapt to new technologies introduced to the market. The product is tailored to the African market by directly addressing the concerns surrounding the safety of payments and reducing the risks of transactions, which remains a barrier to doing business for new entrants into African markets. As a result of merchants’ fears regarding the technological and political risks factors, Africa has in many ways been limited or excluded from many of the break through technologies within the areas of mobile commerce and mobile billing. Jide Akindele, CEO of MMIT commented on these issues explaining, “unfortunately corruption remains a substantial risk within the mobile money industry in Sub-Saharan Africa. This has resulted in a reluctance from the world’s app stores and mobile brands to engage the African market.”

M-Iflo essentially is an intermediary between mobile merchants and mobile wallet providers. The product acts as a payment verification portal that provides a secure way for mobile content providers to reach African markets. This enables consumers of mobile wallets to select their wallet provider as a form of payment at the check out page of the transacting website. M-Iflo additionally allows those without mobile wallets to buy content from major app stores by using a top up card that can be purchased at retail outlets. Upon purchase of the top up card, codes are provided for the customer to enter upon checkout of a merchant site to complete the transaction online.

M-Iflo minimizes associated risks with online transactions and allows merchants to be paid up front, thus creating a work around to the common complexities of conducting business in Africa. This addresses app stores and merchant concerns of payments being held up in one country based on bureaucracy, fraud, or changes in regulation. Bango CEO Ray Anderson said: “There’s a smartphone boom in Africa and a frustrated demand for digital content. App stores and other merchants have been waiting for the reassurance of M-Iflo, which limits the risk of doing business in Africa, and has been designed to suit the ‘cash up front’ instincts of the African market.”

Post1 2

M-Iflo has already integrated with major mobile wallet providers in Africa, including Mobipay in Kenya, Stanbic IBTC Mobile Money in Nigeria, and is working to add more to the list of partners. Jide Akindele, CEO of MMIT stated, “Merchants in the western market are yearning for a suitable payment process platform that minimizes their risk in the African market. We believe that our M-Iflo platform gives our clients that capability to do so. We look forward to opening up access to content store owners that are looking at the African market via Bango and MMIT’s Mobile money payment processing platform.”

MMIT is looking forward to this summer as the product officially launches in Nigeria with Stanbic within the coming weeks followed by Kenya’s launch later this summer.


Rebecca's blog signature

In my first article on the growth of the African Consumer I looked at the emerging middle class of Africa and the role mobile technology has played on the continent.  In this article I focus on the challenges that still exist and look at whether this current growth can be continued and sustained.

A lot of the media has focused on the rise and growth of the African continent and consumer but even with this rise and growth there are still major problems that plague the continent.  There is growth but most of it is a jobless growth.  There is poverty, inequality, health concerns, consumers with lack of resources and capital being excluded from the formal economy (a large percentage of population is part of the informal economy and cash based), a narrow demand structure of those who are part of the formal sector, corruption, and weak infrastructure.

Lagos

 

 

 

 

 

Also many do not understand that Africa is not a homogeneous region, it is highly fragmented, with many different countries (54 in all), with many different laws, languages, customs, business cultures, and varying degrees of education.  But even with all of these issues and concerns there is great hope and optimism for Africa in the near and long term future.  The biggest question is how to make sure the current growth is continual and sustainable.Image

Some of the key components of continued growth according to Steven Radelet in “Emerging Africa” is: access to information, a better business enabling environment, access to finance, and collaboration of private and public sectors to come together to make these other 3 things become a reality. I will first look at the access to information.  Africa is losing the moniker of the Dark Continent as technology is allowing more people to become informed.  I briefly discussed the use of the mobile phone for the betterment of lives in Africa in my last article.  There is an increase in digital consumers in mobile and this leapfrogging technology is disrupting the traditional and current business models.  Over 80 million people currently log into the internet through their mobile phones and more undersea fiber optic cables are being installed which will allow even more people to be connected in the near future.

Africa needs a stronger and better business enabling environment.  There is a need for harmonization and integration across markets that will allow the growth of inter Sub-Saharan African trade and scalable markets and more regional markets and trade blocks.  One of the major questions that confronts Africa is the creation of regional trade blocks and will these trade blocks allow Africa to become one market?  And does Africa have right institutions and frameworks to create regional trade blocks?  This is a question better answered by policy makers and politicians but it is something to continue to look at and monitor.  Continued growth is also part of the political and macroeconomic stability fostered by governments taking accountability.  Less corruption and more transparency along with democratic rights are important for sustained growth.

Image

There is also a need for Africans to become manufacturers of what they consume for growth to be sustainable.  The creation of strong manufacturing and industrial base is vital to internal African growth.  Currently Africans are consumers of things they don’t produce and they need to be able to satisfy the needs of their growing and large domestic markets.  There is also a need to change from an import/export model of growth in regards to revenue streams to more domestic growth being spurred by increasing population, urbanization, and increase in income and decline in poverty.  This can be spurred on by a collaboration of public and private sectors, increased financing, and the entrepreneurial spirit that exists in many African countries.

So for the near to short term I see the major areas of growth and potential growth being: retail, telecommunications, ICT (Information and Communication Technologies), finance services and banking, home and personal care products, agri-business and staple foods.  In my opinion retail can be a key contributor to job creation and in some countries there is already a high demand for retail space by domestic and international retailers.  Also it is important that products are affordable and of great necessity to those that will be consuming them.  I hope you have appreciated the two articles about the growth of the African consumer and if you have any thoughts or ideas you would like to contribute feel free to contact me.

Anthony Bio for Blogs

 

Image

So I am home, back in Nigeria, but I can say I thoroughly enjoyed my time in Barcelona and I learned a lot at Mobile World Congress last week.  Over 70,000 people attended the MWC according to the GSMA with visitors arriving from more than 200 countries.  The exhibit halls were large and packed at times but I was able to see what I wanted to see and meet with different companies and people that I wanted to connect with.

Image

The basic message of MWC in my opinion is the focus on interaction that takes place over mobile networks.  Being connected and having the ability to transact while on the go, having access to tailored content, viewing what you want when you want, sharing ones experiences on the fly, engaging in real-time was the biggest theme I noticed over and over again as I walked through the different halls and looked at the different exhibits. Operators are faced with growing expectations from their subscribers and are busy crafting strategies on how to meet the demand and subscriber expectations for a real-time connected experience that is seamless and affordable.

My hope for MWC 2014 is more of the MMIT team will be able to join me and next year MMIT can have its own kiosk showcasing our products and services.

Image

Kim Fraser is the COO of MMIT and has over 20 years of telecommunication/mobile experiences at companies in North America and Africa.  Kim can be reached at kim.f@mmitonline.com

Image

Today is the last day of the MWC and I plan to spend my day taking a serious look at the Apps/Payment space in hall 7. On the first day it took me 1 ½ hours by taxi to get from my hotel to the MWC Convention Hall.  I was under the assumption that taxis and traffic were normal here in Barcelona but I can now say that may not be the case.  It appears the bottleneck from the first day was the result of the Real Madrid-Barcelona football match that started about one hour after the closing of the MWC exhibition Hall.

I now have had two days at this event and I am not so sure Mobile World Congress is the right moniker any longer.   Possibly the Digital World Congress or the Connected World Congress describes what is happening in the convergence of information, applications and telecommunications.  Near Field Communication, or NFC,  is at the front and center with a number of outlets that are NFC enabled.  The event registration was NFC enabled and approximately 270 restaurants/retail outlets are also NFC enabled for this event.

The mobile phone is becoming a standard piece of equipment that is vital for todays interconnected on the go World.  Entertainment, audio video, mobile TV, work, navigation, payments, cloud access, presentations on the fly (Windows 8 phones), emergencies, security, etc.  It seems there is no part of our daily lives that is not influenced by mobile technology. The three traditional screens, the PC, TV, and mobile are definitely merging into one seamless experience.  Gone are the days when the focus was on the the latest radio access network innovation, or advances in the core network.   That’s in the background now.  In 2013 it’s all about user experience and winning subscribers/users by focusing on the user experience.

Image

Kim Fraser is the COO of MMIT, a mobile software developer in Lagos, Nigeria.  Kim has over twenty years of experience in the telecommunications industry and has worked for telecommunication companies in Canada, West Africa, and East Africa.  Kim can be contacted at kim.f@mmitonline.com.