Archives for category: Mobile Payments

Mobile Market Look: Tanzania

Tanzania

According to the Alliance for Financial Inclusion, mobile money accounts now outnumber bank accounts in nine African countries. Among them is the east African country of Tanzania – the next destination for MMIT’s Mobile Market Look series.


Tanzania is the second largest economy in east Africa and ranked the 6th most populous country in Africa, with just below 50 million people (2013). Although it remains one of the poorest countries in the world, the nation has a bright future with promising untapped potential. Mainly known for its gold exporting and tourism sector with Mount Kilimanjaro, the Serengeti, and the beaches of Zanzibar, the country has so much more to offer beneath the surface.

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Tanzania is growing at a faster rate then most of Sub-Sahara Africa. From 2001 to 2014 Sub-Sahara Africa has recorded annual GDP growth rates between 4% and 5%, while Tanzania has seen rates between 6% and 7%. Tanzania’s projected rates until 2017 are predicted to be 7% or higher annually. Over the years, Tanzania has transpired as a popular destination for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) initiatives due to the political stability, location, and favorable investment regulations. The country has also been a major beneficiary of the Bill and Melina Gates foundation and continues to improve in areas of human development. Emerging industries that are increasingly gaining attention and more investment within the nation include agriculture, natural resources, transport, financial services, telecommunications, and our focus – mobile payments.

Mobile Money in Tanzania

MOBILE_PHONE-IMAGE-e1378131623527Although Kenya is the undisputed trendsetter when it comes to mobile money, Tanzania has been one of the fastest and most successful markets to adopt mobile payments systems. The first mobile payment product in Tanzania was the Kenyan mobile money transfer service M-Pesa, launched by Vodacom in 2008 just one year after its debut in Kenya.

As of last year, Tanzania surpassed Kenya in terms of transaction volumes to become the leading country for mobile payments. Tanzania has exceeded Kenya in terms of mobile money usage in 2013. According to a report by the GSMA, 44% of Tanzanian adults used some form of mobile money compared to 38% in Kenya.

The total value of transactions in 2013 was $17.7 billion (USD), which accounted for over half of Tanzania’s GDP at 54%. The number of mobile phone subscribers also continues to grow at an unprecedented rate. Mobile phone penetration was approaching 70% at the end of 2014 with an annual subscriber growth rate of over 20%. In 2014, about 55% of Tanzania’s mobile subscribers use mobile money services, with over 16 million registered mobile money users. According to the GSMA, over 11 million of these accounts are active within a 90-day period and providers are processing more than 99 million transactions per month valued at over 3 trillion TZS ($1.8 billion USD).

Tanzania mHealth 500Mobile money products within Tanzania are quickly evolving serving the population with new innovative ways to carry out transactions, some never before seen in any other market of the world. Transactions are moving beyond the traditional airtime top-ups and money transfer options offered by the likes of M-Pesa to offer more mobile money payment capabilities. Tanzanian consumers now have a plethora of mobile money payment options for salaries, bills, utilities, fuel, insurance, bus passes, micro-financing, healthcare, physical goods, and beyond.

One of the newest innovations is an interest-earning mobile money product. Customers receive quarterly interest for storing money on their mobiles, a similar concept to gaining interest in a bank account. Tanzania seems to be quickly emerging as a target market for companies to pilot new mobile innovations due to the success of mobile money and favorable market conditions. Examples of new mobile innovations targeting Tanzania outside of mobile money initiatives include Facebook’s internet.org, Tigo’s music streaming service, or Ex-Apple CEO, John Sculley’s Obi Mobile smart phone brand.

Why has Tanzania been so successful?

Nearly 6 years ago, Tanzania had one of the highest population percentages of financially excluded citizens. Lack of trust, understanding, and access to formal banking systems are just some of the reasons people are unbanked. Mobile phone ownership rates have grown rapidly in the country and the majority of the population have access to a mobile phone, creating a favorable environment for mobile payments. According to the InterMedia FITS (Financial Inclusion Tracker Survey) study in 2012, even among underprivileged households of rural, unbanked, and poor (living on less than $2 a day) – 50% of these families had access to a mobile phone and owned a SIM card.

The Central Bank of Tanzania (BoT) is openly supportive of mobile money usage and is actively engaging in related initiatives in moving Tanzania towards becoming a cashless society. The use of financial services has doubled in the past 5 years due to the mobile surge. The BoT’s goal was to increase the share of the population with access to financial services from 27% in 2009 to 50% in 2015. This goal was not only achieved but was also exceeded in 2013 at 54% – achieved 2 years earlier than planned. Tanzania has been recognized as one of the leading countries of Africa for demonstrating a favorable environment and policy for promoting financial inclusion.

The mobile money industry is regulated under structures that differ from typical financial services providers. Major players within the industry work together – the Tanzanian government, mobile network operators (MNOs), and financial services – in collaboration to develop a sustainable mobile money framework. Industry consolidation of MNOs occurred in 2011 into 2012 due to price wars and to prevent market saturation.

Tanzania’s mobile money ecosystem is ripe for interoperability and could be one of the first countries to fully capitalize on the benefits. The four largest MNOs – Airtel, Vodacom, Tigo, and Zantel, have established partnerships with the BoT and the two largest banks – CRDB Bank and National Microfinance Bank. The purpose of these partnerships is to craft regulations for the industry and as a first step in the direction of interoperability.        

What is the future of Mobile Money in Tanzania?

The absence of interoperability remains a major impediment within the mobile payment industry. Interoperability is the ability for different information technology systems and services to communicate and exchange data. Without it, consumers suffer from lack of flexibility and accessibility to a wider array of services. Customers may receive mobile money from a different service than what they currently have, which may force them to travel a considerable distance to set up a new mobile money account, wait in line, cash-out, and then have multiple mobile money options on their phones.

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It is estimated that 75% of Tanzanians live in rural areas, which presents a challenge for any agent network system within the country. Based on a FITS user survey many consumers have experienced issues with the current mobile money provider agents, mainly issues of inconsistency, insufficient e-float, absenteeism, or insufficient help with transactions. The easier the payment structure, the more likely they are to use it again or continue to use on a frequent basis; this will ultimately result in an increase in overall transaction volumes.

However, as commonly seen throughout Sub-Sahara Africa, many industry players refuse to open up doors to competitors – even if it could be to their benefit. Additionally, several country governments within Africa exercise forms of protectionism placing restraints on players within the mobile payments industry and their roles within the ecosystem.

The next initiative for the BoT is to find a way to link all of these mobile money users with formal banking institutions to drive up the percentage of the financially included. Tanzanians no longer need to invest their money in livestock or jewelry, but can store value on their phones and now start earning interest. Services within the market are still highly competitive and are constantly looking to introduce new mobile money options to grab a higher market share. Such innovations are benefiting consumers and changing life as they know it.

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Screen Shot 2014-10-28 at 11.38.40 AM Las Vegas, NV November 2nd-5th 2014 – MMIT will be attending the Money 20/20 Conference at the Aria Casino and Resort in Las Vegas. Money 20/20 is the leading conference for global innovations in money and will be attended by over 7,000 people, including 700 plus CEO’s from 2,400 companies in 60 plus countries. There will be over 500 speakers and some of the key note speakers at this year’s event include Hill Ferguson from Paypal, Kenneth Chenault from American Express, and Tom Taylor from Amazon to name a few. There will also be over 400 sponsors and exhibitors at this event. To find out more about Money 20/20 please visit http://www.money2020.com.

MMIT is a mobile payment processing company that focuses on the Sub-Saharan African market. We work with some of the largest financial institutions in Africa and have access to over 80 million consumers in East and West Africa. MMIT’s mobile technology platform offers secure, fast, and easy payment solutions. MMIT is dedicated to creating forward thinking payment solutions for each transactional demand, all through your mobile phone. To find out more about MMIT please visit http://www.mmitonline.com. Rebecca's blog signature

This will be the first in our new series, “Mobile Market Look”, where we look at mobile markets in Africa and other emerging countries around the World. Kenya is one of the hotbeds in terms of mobile innovation and sophistication and we hope you enjoy this article and please feel free to leave any comments you may have.

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Africa has been growing at an unprecedented rate and Kenya is one of the fastest growing tech and mobile markets in the World. Known as “Savannah Silicon Valley”, Kenya is home to over 500 startups in the mobile and digital industries. Kenyans are extremely tech savvy and 70% of the population owns a mobile phone, with 16 million Kenyans accessing the internet through their phones. Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is home to the ihubs, incubator space for the tech community that includes 10,000 members an over 150 incubator start-up companies. Companies such as Google, Intel, and Samsung have a presence in Nairobi and IBM set up its first African Innovation Lab in Kenya. If you are in the mobile or tech industry, whether as a company or an investor, Kenya is a country you should get to know and want to do business in.

Kenya is the most developed economy in East Africa with a good education system and a strong business environment. Kenya is a young country with 70% of the population of 44 million people under the age of 35. Kenya also has its issues as 50% of the population lives in poverty and unemployment, although officially listed as 10.5%, can be as high as 40%. There are obstacles, but there are also opportunities. And no opportunity is bigger in Kenya at this time than the mobile money and mobile payment market.

Kenya’s Mobile Market Landscape

Kenya phones Kenya has the most sophisticated mobile money ecosystem in Africa, and maybe the World. Infrastructure improvements, and lack of rigid regulations by the Central Bank of Kenya and the government, have led to market growth and an increase in digital services. M-Pesa, established by Safaricom in 2007, started the current mobile payment revolution and now transacts over $5 billion annually which accounts for 17% of Kenya’s GDP. Over 2 million mobile money transactions take place every day and according to MEF studies mobile money and mobile payments still present the greatest opportunity for growth in Kenya. It is estimated that 85% of the population has used mobile money at some point and most Kenyans prefer mobile money to cash because of the ease of use and the safety. Most African nations are cash-based and people still carry large sums of cash on them, especially when they are sending money to relatives in remote parts of the country, so mobile money offers a safer and easier alternative. Kenya’s financial institutions have picked up on this and are jumping on the bandwagon and creating their own mobile money products. Equity Bank has its own M-Kesho mobile money product and I&M Bank has its own prepaid Safari Card available on the M-Pesa platform.

Even with growth and prosperity Kenya faces security issues and economic problems. There have recently been terrorist attacks on the Kenyan coast by Al-Shabaab, a Somali terrorist group associated with Al-Qaeda, and no one should forget the terrorist attacks that took place at the Westgate Mall in Nairobi over a year ago. The country has a high poverty rate and weak infrastructure and on the business side there is a lack of capital and belief and faith by investors towards the Kenyan market, and also the Sub-Saharan African market as a whole. Even the mobile market is experiencing its own issues. There is a current price war which has benefited the consumers by leading to decreased prices and more mobile subscriptions, but has created lean profit margins and less profitability for the mobile operators. There is also the concern of the dominance of Safaricom and M-Pesa who currently has the dominant mobile marketshare of 70%. Other mobile operators such as Airtel, Yu, and Orange have a presence but pale in comparison to Safaricom.ihub Kenya

Obstacles do exist, but even with these problems and many others the mobile industry in Kenya is experiencing good times. Mobile phone penetration is 78% in Kenya and Africa had an annual mobile growth rate of 82% between 2000 and 2013, highest in the World. There are currently 500 million mobile subscriptions in Africa and there is expected growth in subscriptions of 50% over the next 5 years. Kenyans have also taken to smart phone technology and 67% of all phones sold in Kenya are smartphones. Kenyans like to listen to music, play games, look for sports updates, and watch TV and video on their phones. They also like social media and Kenya has the second most Twitter users in Africa behind South Africa and the second most Facebook users in Africa behind Nigeria. So the promise and potential is bright and the opportunities for business and investment is maybe the best it has ever been. Kenya is definitely a place you should want to be!

Please visit MMIT at www.mmitonline.com and subscribe to our newsletter by contacting us at newsletter@mmitonline.com

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African SMEs and Entrepreneurs – the time is now!

Africa is quickly emerging as a top contender for business expansion in large company ventures. In many ways, Africa has been referred to as the “next Asia” with strong investment growth. After all, the continent is home to 7 of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world. The future has been looking much brighter for Africa, especially in the last decade where we have seen Africa’s GDP more than double.

According to EY’s recent attractiveness survey for 2014, Sub-Sahara Africa places in second place.  Three years ago in 2011 SSA was listed 3rd from last on the same list. This year, North America is the only region that ranks ahead of Africa in terms of investment attractiveness.

Growth within these nations not only provides incentive for foreign direct investment (FDI) from all over the world, but also more importantly provides immense opportunities for African entrepreneurs across the continent. EY also cites Intra-African investment and development as a major source of growth for the continent.

Inherently Africa has a high level of risk associated with business investment with many nations battle political instability, corruption, and problems associated with the lack of proper infrastructure. All of these factors contribute to the risk in conducting business in Africa which is eminently complex. In the past, such issues have resulted in the hesitation by global companies from exploring expansion into African nations. However in present day, it appears investors have been able to see beyond negative headlines of nations such as Nigeria, Kenya, and Sudan due to the market potential outweighing many of the risks.

Africa micro business While many large size multinational enterprises (MNEs) such as Nissan, H&M, and Burger King are making headlines for their decisions to expand into Africa for business ventures, the success behind these rapidly growing countries is largely due to SMEs, small and medium sized enterprises. Several MNEs have recently been attracted to the region due to significant improvements in regulatory, legal, and business systems. However, according to IFC and World Bank reports, over 90% of all businesses in Sub-Saharan Africa are SMEs. Aside from this, there is also the informal market of micro businesses that are largely unaccounted for.

With the exciting growth of the mobile phone industry, it presents a major opportunity for Sub Saharan companies to prosper. MMIT, Mobile Media Info Tech, a Nigerian software provider of mobile payments is an example of how Nigerian entrepreneurs and SMEs can benefit from the recent growth trends. With the significant increase in cell phone users, mobile opportunities are abundant. MMIT quickly entered the market by creating M-Wallet and M-Diaspora products.  These products allowed Nigerians to use their mobile phones to pay for products, acting as a mobile wallet, and our M-Diaspora product which allowed ex-pat Nigerians in the United States and United Kingdom to send money to friends and relatives in Nigeria. MMIT saw the opportunity and benefit of mobile payments, a technology that has revolutionized the African consumers’ lack of banking access and dependency on carrying cash.

With the overwhelming majority of the business landscape being SMEs, they are instrumental to the growth of the economy within the Sub-Saharan region. African SMEs growth and development helps create the desperately needed jobs within the formal economy which can ultimately boost economic growth and stability. Although things are looking up, reports of high unemployment rates in SSA, particularly among the youth, continues to plague the continent. The need for the creation of jobs and infrastructure is still in dire need to foster the current economic growth and to sustain it.  Therefore, it is imperative that they do not ignore these rising opportunities created by the economic growth of the past years.

Business in Africa is challenging and varies significantly from country to country which further adds to the degree of difficulty for foreign entrants. African companies have many advantages that they can capitalize especially in terms of market knowledge, understanding of consumer behavior, and realizing what innovations can revolutionize the African way of life. African companies partnering with foreign companies is another smart option for both sides of the spectrum as local African business are able to fill many of the gaps that large MNEs cannot always fill. With new economic developments and increasing incomes, consumers are demanding access to more goods more than ever before. African entrepreneurs and SMEs should seize the opportunities before the MNE’s flood gates open.

To follow MMIT please visit www.mmitonline.com and to subscribe to our monthly newsletter please contact us at newsletter@mmitonline.com


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New mobile payment product M-Iflo launched to minimize risks as it is of great concern in the African markets.

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MMIT in partnership with Bango, a leader in mobile payments, has officially launched a product called M-Iflo to revolutionize the security of mobile payment environment in Sub-Sahara Africa. The M-Iflo product provides a safe payment solution that enables online transactions for digital content, which will unlock many opportunities in the world of mobile payments for Africa.

Africa is rapidly becoming a mobile hot spot with many consumers’ displaying their natural ability to quickly adapt to new technologies introduced to the market. The product is tailored to the African market by directly addressing the concerns surrounding the safety of payments and reducing the risks of transactions, which remains a barrier to doing business for new entrants into African markets. As a result of merchants’ fears regarding the technological and political risks factors, Africa has in many ways been limited or excluded from many of the break through technologies within the areas of mobile commerce and mobile billing. Jide Akindele, CEO of MMIT commented on these issues explaining, “unfortunately corruption remains a substantial risk within the mobile money industry in Sub-Saharan Africa. This has resulted in a reluctance from the world’s app stores and mobile brands to engage the African market.”

M-Iflo essentially is an intermediary between mobile merchants and mobile wallet providers. The product acts as a payment verification portal that provides a secure way for mobile content providers to reach African markets. This enables consumers of mobile wallets to select their wallet provider as a form of payment at the check out page of the transacting website. M-Iflo additionally allows those without mobile wallets to buy content from major app stores by using a top up card that can be purchased at retail outlets. Upon purchase of the top up card, codes are provided for the customer to enter upon checkout of a merchant site to complete the transaction online.

M-Iflo minimizes associated risks with online transactions and allows merchants to be paid up front, thus creating a work around to the common complexities of conducting business in Africa. This addresses app stores and merchant concerns of payments being held up in one country based on bureaucracy, fraud, or changes in regulation. Bango CEO Ray Anderson said: “There’s a smartphone boom in Africa and a frustrated demand for digital content. App stores and other merchants have been waiting for the reassurance of M-Iflo, which limits the risk of doing business in Africa, and has been designed to suit the ‘cash up front’ instincts of the African market.”

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M-Iflo has already integrated with major mobile wallet providers in Africa, including Mobipay in Kenya, Stanbic IBTC Mobile Money in Nigeria, and is working to add more to the list of partners. Jide Akindele, CEO of MMIT stated, “Merchants in the western market are yearning for a suitable payment process platform that minimizes their risk in the African market. We believe that our M-Iflo platform gives our clients that capability to do so. We look forward to opening up access to content store owners that are looking at the African market via Bango and MMIT’s Mobile money payment processing platform.”

MMIT is looking forward to this summer as the product officially launches in Nigeria with Stanbic within the coming weeks followed by Kenya’s launch later this summer.


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Stanbic IBTC MobileMoney partners with MMIT; provides payment options for international online shopping

25 October 2013 Lagos, Nigeria – Stanbic IBTC Bank and Mobile Money Info Tech Limited, MMIT, have partnered to bring international online shopping payment options to Nigerian consumers.  Stanbic’s MobileMoney platform will be the first mobile money operator in Nigeria that offers the service of allowing consumers who do not have a credit card to pay for goods through their mobile money wallets when shopping on international app sites.

Customers who operate Stanbic IBTC Bank’s *909# MobileMoney wallets will be able to shop on international app sites such as Amazon, the Android store, Playstation, and other gaming sites. They will be given the option of making card less payments through their mobile money wallets; with this option any customer with a smart phone will be able to make purchases on these online sites regardless of where they reside in Nigeria.

Thabo Makoko, Head of E-Business at Stanbic IBTC Bank, described the partnership as another step towards financial inclusion for individuals who are usually not able to shop online because of the lack of credit and credit cards. “Mobile payments have taken a new turn in Nigeria and the days of being inconvenienced or excluded from participating in the digital economy as a result of ones inability to produce credit or debit card details for online payments are over.

“We want to provide more opportunities for the under banked in every part of Nigeria – especially the small business owners; we want to be known as the financial service partner that opens doors for our customers; empowering them to grow their businesses and lives. Removing the barriers to participating in the digital economy, the online shopping process for small business owners, youths, and the under banked will greatly reduce barriers to success in acquiring tools to improve lives”.

Jide Akindele, chief executive officer of MMIT, also commented on the partnership. “We are excited about our partnership with Stanbic IBTC Bank. We see this as a great opportunity for Stanbic IBTC mobile money subscribers who will be able to make more financial decisions.

“This partnership will make Stanbic IBTC mobile money account holders the first in Nigeria to enjoy the option of making payments on foreign online stores.”

Stanbic IBTC Bank intends to reduce the gap in access to financial services between the fully banked and under banked through the use of mobile money in every part of Nigeria. With our MobileMoney wallet the bank is getting closer to achieving this objective.

About Stanbic IBTC

Stanbic IBTC Bank is a subsidiary of Stanbic IBTC Holdings PLC, a full service financial services group with a clear focus on three main business pillars – Corporate and Investment Banking, Personal and Business Banking and Wealth Management. Standard Bank Group, to which Stanbic IBTC Holdings belongs, is rooted in Africa with strategic representation in 18 key sub-Saharan countries and other emerging markets; Standard Bank has been in operation for 150 years and is focused on building first-class on-the-ground banks in chosen countries in Africa and connecting other selected emerging markets to Africa and to each other.

For more information visit http://www.stanbicibtcbank.com

 About MMIT

Mobile Media Info Tech Limited (MMIT) is a mobile software development company with a mission to revolutionize money transfer capabilities, mobile banking, and mobile payment processes. MMIT creates and distributes proprietary mobile technology platforms to augment ways in which mobile and web users can make financial transactions for personal and emergency purposes.

 For more information visit: www.mmitonline.com

When we think of the potential for a cashless society we tend to look at the developed World and markets such as the United States or Europe as the places most likely for this development.  Even with credit cards and smart phones being ubiquitous throughout these countries you would be wise to look to emerging markets as the potential birthplace of a future cashless society.

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Mobile technology is growing and more than 1.7 billion people have cell phones but no bank accounts in emerging and developing markets.  According to the GMSA in 2012 there were123 mobile-money deployments in emerging markets, with 84 of them originating within the last 3 years.  Mobile money has the ability to offer financial services to the unbanked and reach consumers in the remotest parts of the World.  Even with the potential there is still a long way to go and Nigeria is a great example of this.Image

One of the emerging countries leading the cashless society initiative is Nigeria.  The cashless initiative in Nigeria is in its early stages.  The Central Bank of Nigeria, or CBN, has estimated that it will cost over $930 million to invest in new POS terminals, ATM’s, and payment solutions by 2015 as part of its “Cash-Less Lagos Project”.  Recently the CBN announced 40 billion Naira per day is being transacted virtually and the bulk of these transactions are being conducted in Lagos.

Initially CBN was targeting a phased approach post-pilot in Lagos State and then moving to a second phase which CBN claimed would cover close to 90% of all financial transactions in the country.  Due to the success of the Lagos Pilot CBN decided to implement the cashless push nationwide.  One of the stumbling blocks was the lack of infrastructure to facilitate cashless transactions conveniently and relatively close to the population. Kim Fraser, COO of MMIT, commented on the problems with the pilot program in Nigeria.  “In the Lagos Pilot there were only 10,000 POS systems on the ground in Lagos State.   Today there are over 150,000 POS systems deployed. It is still a small number to cover a country as large as Nigeria.  In addition the CBN has also realized that the term “Cashless” was scaring a lot of people especially in a country where 80% of the population is unbanked. The new catch phrase that the CBN prefers is “Cashlite”. There is still a significant way to go even under the new mantra of Cashlite though CBN appears to be making progress”.

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The debate for a cashless society has its positives and negatives.  For financial institutions a positive development of a cashless society is its ability to reduce costs required to print money and increase its consumer base and services to include the non-banked of the emerging and developing World.  For consumers there is an ease for transactions and the prospect of no longer having to carry cash.  Carrying cash can be a major problem in emerging countries where the risk of being robbed is greater. There is also potential for less corruption and more transparency in a cashless society.

The negatives include the invasion of privacy; security and fraud, and the wide divergence in the experience of mobile money service providers around the world.  There are some obvious hurdles that are slowing the progress of a cashless society including the lack of infrastructure, scalability, and the sustainability of mobile financial services.  So what does this mean for telecom and financial institutions?  It means there exists opportunities for the continued development of new financial products and greater customer education for their products.  If the telecom providers and financial institutions can create a healthy relationship with each other and with their consumer bases there can be continued growth and success for mobile money and other cashless initiatives.

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MMIT’s M-Content platform has been developed with the African Sub-Saharan market in mind. In a continent that is growing rapidly and has over 700 million mobile phone subscribers opportunities are endless.  In Nigeria there are over 16 million users of Facebook, Skype, Blackberry, Apple, and Android. In Kenya there are over 7 million users of these same devices.  On the flip side of those numbers only 24% of working age adults in Sub-Saharan Africa hold a traditional bank account with a formal financial institution and a considerably lower percentage of adults have credit or debit cards. With our M-Content platform we will be providing a way for this underserved segment to access and purchase online content and apps they wish to have on their mobiles and PCs.

Before I go further let me first describe our M-Content platform and some of the services it provides our consumers.  Our M-Content product allows consumers with a mobile money wallet, and also consumers who don’t have a mobile money wallet, to purchase content from sites like the Blackberry store, Google, Amazon, the Android store, and I Tunes to name a few and top up or apply credit on gaming and social media sites such as Facebook, EA Sports, Sony Play-Station, and Skype. It also allows consumers who want to purchase apps or apply credit on various sites to do so via their mobile phone, PC or tablet.  Our platform provides a convenient way to do this without the need to use credit or debit cards and instead utilize cash vouchers and the mobile wallet. This eliminates the risk of exposing one’s credit card or debit card on the internet or having the transaction denied due the card coming from a high risk region for fraud and opens the door to such E and M-commerce sites for larger numbers of consumers in emerging markets who do not have access to credit and debit cards.

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MMIT is aware of the possibilities and is currently at work on our M-Content platform and expects this product to be launched and live by the beginning of 2013.  We will keep you up to date on the product launch and will announce the official launch date once that decision has been made.  To learn more about MMIT, our M-Content platform, and the other products and services MMIT provides please visit our website at http://www.mmitonline.com.

A look at the predicted mobile payment growth in Nigeria

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